Climate Change Risk Assessment shows the UK needs to adapt

Defra have published ‘The Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA)‘ This highlights the top 100 challenges to the UK and our economy of a changing climate and “provides the most compelling evidence yet of the need to increase our resilience”. A Government report published alongside the CCRA gives details of plans which will address some of the risks identified.
The Government has also announced a National Adaptation Programme that will prepare the UK for the effects of climate change, including the risks set out in the CCRA.
People are encouraged to give their views through a new website on the action needed to tackle the implications of climate change where they live and work. Among the key risks the CCRA identifies are:

* Hotter summers present significant health risks. The CCRA projects that without measures to reduce the risk, there could be between 580-5,900 additional premature deaths per year by the 2050s.
* Increasing pressure on the UK’s water resources. The CCRA projects that without action to improve water resources, there could be major supply shortages by the 2050s in parts of the north, south and east of England with the greatest challenge in the Thames River basin.
* The risks of flooding are projected to increase significantly across the UK. New analysis for England and Wales show that if no further plans were made to adapt to changing flood risks, by the 2080s due the effects of climate change and population growth annual damages to buildings and property could reach between £2.1billion – £12billion, compared to current costs of £1.2billion.
* The number of days in an average year when temperatures rise above 26 degrees C is projected to rise from 18 days to between 27-121 days in London by the 2080s. This could mean greater demand for energy to cool buildings and more heat related illnesses.
* Increases in drought and some pest and diseases could reduce timber yields and quality. Projected drought conditions could mean a drop in timber yields of between 10% and 25% by the 2080s in the south east, driving up timber costs.

Both reports and related info can be found on this link.

Source: Low Carbon Communities website

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